[NYCkayaker] Gratitude from a Whale and what about Right whales?

Lee Reiser/Leona Fontaine lee060@earthlink.net
Sat Apr 13 07:20:30 EDT 2013


Thank you all,
 But I cannot take credit for writing this beautiful story. 
It was passed on to me by my fabulous wife, Leona.
I am merely a messenger who paseed it onto all of my friends.
Lee


-----Original Message-----
>From: Jeff Kraus <jeffk3@verizon.net>
>Sent: Apr 13, 2013 12:18 AM
>To: davisjanowski@yahoo.com
>Cc: Robert Huszar <r-huszar@panix.com>, Lee Reiser/Leona Fontaine <lee060@earthlink.net>, "NYCkayaker@rockandwater.net" <NYCkayaker@rockandwater.net>, Martin Wellhoefer <captain@hrckc.org>, "YPRC@listserv.adelphi.edu" <YPRC@listserv.adelphi.edu>
>Subject: Re: [NYCkayaker] Gratitude from a Whale and what about Right whales?
>
>Excellent story, and well told by Lee, to whom I wish untangled nets as well. May you have the waters you desire.
>
>We've been on whale watch boats where all the people with long lenses were dumbfounded when the humpbacks showed up right alongside the boat, peering at us, and all they got was photos of eyeballs! We also did an Earthwatch trip off Maui following possibly mating humpbacks, where the male escorts were brutally slashing each other with their pectorals, drawing blood, while we were recording it all 15 feet back. They clearly knew we were around but avoided us even when we were actually in the water. Spectacular animals indeed!
>
>North Atlantic Right Whales spend their summers in the Bay of Fundy but presumably mate and give birth off Georgia or around there. There are about 400 indeed, and they swim slowly past the New York waters twice a year. They do get hit by boats and in the Boston area warnings are now issued to boats to slow down when they are moving through. It may be possible to see them off New York but they tend to be pretty far off shore due to their pathway out in the Gulf Stream. That said, I always keep an eye out but so far nothing!
>
>Of course, humpbacks are the most dramatic presence for whale watchers. Right whales, finbacks and blues only surface to breathe and are really hard to spot despite their huge size. We've seen blue whales in the Saint Laurence Estuary and until I actually saw one I didn't believe they were there. Now it's well established and man, they are amazing, even if you need a fine guide to find them - check out www.rorqual.com. Awesome programs up there, and you get to eat excellent French food in little Quebec seaside towns. And you get to be right next to Right Whales!
>
>As an intermediate kayaker, I don't know how all this fits in with paddling. If you are ready to meet whales while paddling, go for it. As for me, I am still surprised when a thousand brant geese fly squawking over my boat. The season is starting for us non-winter paddlers, and I can't wait to see what happens...
>
>Jeff (Sebago Canoe Club)
>
>On Apr 12, 2013, at 11:07 PM, davisjanowski@yahoo.com wrote:
>
>> I got chills as well. Humpbacks are amazingly social. We saw some up in Newfoundland last year during vacation. This post reminded me of something I have wondered about for years too.
>> 
>> Does the population of around 400 Right Whales that live mostly up around Boston ever make it down as far south as New York waters? Any offshore kayakers seen one? Or any whales for that often?
>> 
>> They have even put out a grouping of microphones along the shipping lanes to pick up their sounds so that ship warnings can be issued up there.
>>  
>> 
>> 
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> From: Robert Huszar <r-huszar@panix.com>
>> To: Lee Reiser/Leona Fontaine <lee060@earthlink.net>
>> Cc: "NYCkayaker@rockandwater.net" <NYCkayaker@rockandwater.net>; Martin Wellhoefer <captain@hrckc.org>; "YPRC@listserv.adelphi.edu" <YPRC@listserv.adelphi.edu>
>> Sent: Friday, April 12, 2013 12:24 PM
>> Subject: Re: [NYCkayaker] Gratitude from a Whale
>> 
>> Wow, that really is a beautiful story. I got chills all over just reading 
>> it. Thanks for sharing!!!
>> 
>> On Fri, 12 Apr 2013, Lee Reiser/Leona Fontaine wrote:
>> 
>>> Gratitude -
>>> 
>>> ...The Whale... If you read a recent front page story of the San Francisco Chronicle, you would have read about a female humpback whale who had become entangled in a spiderweb of crab traps and lines. She was weighted down by hundreds of pounds of traps that caused her to struggle to stay afloat. She also had hundreds of yards of line rope wrapped around her body, her tail, her torso and a line tugging in her mouth.
>>> 
>>> A fisherman spotted her just east of the Farallon Islands (outside the Golden Gate ) and radioed an environmental group for help. Within a few hours, the rescue team arrived and determined that she was so bad off, the only way to save her was to dive in and untangle her. They worked for hours with curved knives and eventually freed her.
>>> 
>>> When she was free, the divers say she swam in what seemed like joyous circles. She then came back to each and every diver, one at a time, and nudged them, pushed them gently around as she was thanking them.
>>> 
>>> Some said it was the most incredibly beautiful experience of their lives. The guy who cut the rope out of her mouth said her eyes were following him the whole time, and he will never be the same.
>>> 
>>> May you, and all those you love, be so blessed and fortunate to be surrounded by people who will help you get untangled from the things that are binding you. And, may you always know the joy of giving and receiving gratitude.
>>> 
>>> I pass this on to you, my friends, in the same spirit.
>>> 
>>> Life is good.
>>> 
>>> Lee
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
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>> **********************************************************************
>> The NYCKayaker mailing list is hosted by www.rockandwater.net, and is a public service offered to the kayaking community by the Hudson River Watertrail Association. Learn more about HRWA at www.hrwa.org
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